Tag Archives: fandom

Manga Review: Complex Age, Vol 1

Complex Age 1Author: Yui Sakuma
Genre: Seinen, Drama
Publisher: Kodansha (US) / Kodansha (JP)
Release Date: June 21, 2016
Original Magazine: Weekly Morning
Purchase
A review copy was provided by the publisher.

Like many of us, mid-twenties temp office worker Nagisa Kataura post-work hobbies are what maintain her sanity. In Nagisa’s case cosplay is what makes her tick — dressing as the popular magical girl anime character, Ururu in particular. Well-liked in online communities and popular at cosplay gatherings, in costume Nagisa is fan-made, hand-made perfection, but can she keep her favorite hobby a secret — as well as her insecurities — forever?

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Feedly Friday: May 8, 2015

Feedly Friday is a biweekly round-up of manga-related links from my Feedly/RSS reader and around the web.

And so comes a slow rebirth of the link round-up! I particularly missed posting these, as there’s so much great content in the manga-sphere. Expect Feedly Fridays round-ups to appear every other week. In the meantime, let’s dive back in!

Over at the home-base Organization Anti-Social Geniuses, there’s a giveaway to be had: Enter to win one of three hardcover copies of the forthcoming Yen Press re-release of Emma! I can’t quite describe how much I love this series, and how much I love that it’s getting the deluxe re-release that it so deserves, but this enthused comment certainly shows that I’m not alone!

Also at OSAG, Justin reviews the first volume of Tokyo Ghoul while I tackle the first volume of Meteor Prince. I even got quoted on the Shojo Beat tumblr page!

Looking for another giveaway? Kodansha is giving away the first volume of A Silence Voice on Goodreads. If you’re on the fence about the series — and you shouldn’t be — the series is also available digitally on Crunchyroll.

Over at ANN, this week’s House of 1000 manga takes a different angle and reviews three books about the actual life of a manga artist.

Frog-kun of Fantastic Memes takes a look at “Anime Fandom and Self-Deprecating Humor.” He has some great commentary, especially on self-deprecating humor actually maintaining the status quo.

Over in shoujo land, Shojo Beat posts their pretty releases for the month, and Heart of Manga rounds us out with a month full of releases.

My favorite monthly post appears again (and my eyes go green with collector’s envy) with Ash’s Bookshelf Overload.

For something different, Sedar explores a Korean animated film centered on bullying entitled King of Pigs.

In a small roundup reviews, Manga Test Drive is keeping us busy all through May with review highlights like High School Debut and Ristorante Paradiso. Anna at Manga Report looks at volumes 1-3 of Magi as well as one of my personal favorites, Master Keaton.

Did I miss anything? Feel free to shoot me links in the comments!

Thoughts: Where is your manga community?

Here’s something that’s been running through my head for a bit: What is the manga (or anime) community like where you live, if there is one?

For me personally, I specifically starting blogging because I really like manga, but I’ve yet to find a community of sorts to really get into my hobby and discuss it. I live in Kentucky, and while not the manga capital of the world (despite popular belief, I know) I live in a decent sized city that has things like a university anime club, manga at libraries, and anime clubs at the library. Still I’ve yet to feel a sense of community outside of the internet.

I’ve always imagined the mecha of manga fandom to be centered on the West Coast and New York City, with their Bookoffs and Kunokuniya’s and Viz’s and Tokyopop’s. I figured that was the place to be. Any time I go out of town anywhere, I google to see if the place I’m visiting has anything manga (or anime) related. I’d like to visit California one day, where I’m sure streets are lined with pages of manga. 🙂

What do you all think? Is there an area in the country (the United States, that is) “best-suited” for an manga fan? Is there a sense of community outside of the internet? If not, can it be created?